Language around disability

Hello,

I hope you are having a good day.

Yesterday I went to a workshop on the language around disability.

I learnt a lot.

One of the activities was thinking of life in terms of two categories.

The first being social the other medical, so examples of the first is friends, holidays, acceptance, negative perceptions and fun. The other hospital, crutches, OT, physio, splints, medication.

What we found was we are more likely to be seen as our medical condition/s and not expected to socialise and go out which is something able-bodied people take for granted.

As a young woman, I want to do what others do. Why should I be seen as inconvenient when I have just as much of a right to go out and explore as anyone else.

It often is the perception of those in society around me that needs to change. I am capable and want to be as independent as possible. I want to resist the perception of people with disabilities.

Take care,

Dolphin xx

Resist

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10 thoughts on “Language around disability

        1. I understand your point, how would you word it instead to make it more positive? From personal experience I feel that it is an individual’s choice on what the refer to. For me when I say I’m “well” others my argue that I’m not but it is based on my own scale as everyone experiences it differently. Take care, Dolphin xx

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        2. I haven’t quite found the words yet. I am still looking for the words to describe my personal struggle with anxiety and depression. I cant see myself describing myself as “mentally ill” when I am a fully functioning member of society – I hope that makes sense. Maybe I am overthinking the word but I cant accept that label to describe my “condition.” Loving this dialogue ❤

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        3. This does make sense. It is a difficult topic which is why I wanted to write about it. I see my depression as a part of me but it doesn’t define me. Let me know when you find the words. Take care, Dolphin xx

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        4. Some people that previously identified as mentally ill now use the term neurologically divergent and people without mental illness neuro-typical

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